Social media has had a profound impact on our state of morality.  Today, children have their whole lives play out on the internet.  All the embarrassing tidbits are laid bare for the world to consume.  For example, l've seen parents post pictures of their little kid potty training (no private bits showing, but still embarrassing).  I think social media has made our ethics/moral definition so lax, that family unity has been replaced by narcissistic selfies and an addiction for "likes".   Everything is fair game and every family member will be sacrificed on the altar of "going viral" if necessary.   

Do you believe social media has impacted the family unit?  Has it made things better or worse for families?  

Lauren

I do believe social media impacts families.  Fortunately, many of my friends who are parents don't share a lot of their children's lives on social media, though they do share photos occasionally.  Sadly, a lot of parents do share way too much about their own lives as well as their children's lives.  Even if you only share with your social media, "friends," people can find your account and see what you're posting if they know how to circumvent the system.  

I don't believe you should share things on social media you wouldn't be comfortable with the whole world seeing.

I also feel like social media disconnects families.  People tend to spend so much time looking at their phones, playing games, being on social media, and so forth that they no longer talk with each other.  Unless families make a real point of it, many are not connecting like they used to before social media sites were around. 

Tim

I also feel like social media disconnects families.  People tend to spend so much time looking at their phones, playing games, being on social media, and so forth that they no longer talk with each other.  Unless families make a real point of it, many are not connecting like they used to before social media sites were around. 

I feel the same way. I pity the kids at restaurants eating by themselves even when their parents were with them. The parents were busy scanning their phones while the poor children eat, then the parents will scold the children when the kids play with their food. Social media can destroy the family.

 

She and I

Lauren:

I also feel like social media disconnects families.  People tend to spend so much time looking at their phones, playing games, being on social media, and so forth that they no longer talk with each other.  Unless families make a real point of it, many are not connecting like they used to before social media sites were around. 

That's the thing right there. Don't blame social media for people taking it more seriously than their own family. It comes down to personal responsibility, and we as a society seem to forget that. Instead of blaming ourselves for not doing enough to keep our family tight, we blame the mechanism for allowing it to happen: Social Media. 

I have a FB account that I used to be active on almost every day. But personal responsibilities within my family dictate that I stay off FB, Reddit, Quora, etc..... and focus on the tasks at hand. If I didn't, my daughter wouldn't be learning a new trade. I had to ask myself  "What's more important, my family or my online activity?" 

Sorry, but if you put more importance on FB than you do your own family, that's on you. Chances are those priorities were the same before the advent of social media.

Jeroen

I am starting to hate social media.
Parents sharing photo's of their kids are violating their right to privacy in a way which I find unacceptable. I see such pictures on my timeline (the other day, a mother was complaining about her kid pooping in the garden). That's the kind of stuff people will hear for decades as a "fun anecdote".You know, the stuff you can't complain about because it's just "innocent fun". I hate that.

I also have the idea it's increasing loneliness. So many people don't have a real conversation anymore, as they check the phone too often. Or Facebook convo's which are hardly anything else than a contest who can come up with the best oneliner...

It's gotten out of hands.

Paige

Lauren, you've brought up a good point, but how do we get our families back on moral high ground once Pandora's box is already opened?  Parents can police their children, but they can't stop their classmates from telling them what another kid said on social media about them.   Parents also can't stop all their relatives and friends from  posting updates about the children or sharing photos with them in it.  I'm not sure how we can remove the distractions or privacy violations because it's mostly outside of our control.  At least it feels that way.